A cocktail recipe from Nicaragua: the Macuá

Drinking cocktails is one of the best ways to escape the summer heat. Of course, a good cocktail has to include my favourite ingredient the Flor de Caña rum from Nicaragua.

The rum inspired me to look for new drinks, and that is how I discovered the Macuá cocktail. A couple of years ago the Macuá cocktail was chosen as the national drink of Nicaragua.

I’ve never tried the cocktail when I was travelling in Nicaragua, but I discovered I missed out on a good drink! The orange and lime juice give it a refreshing taste which is perfect to cool you down.

Macuá cocktail from Nicaragua

Ingredients:

  • 2 parts (white) rum of Flor de Caña
  • 2 parts guava juice
  • 2 parts orange juice
  • 1 part lime juice
  • sugar to taste
  • A handful of ice cubes

After some stirring your cocktail is ready. Decorate it with a slice of lime.

Close your eyes, take a sip and imagine yourself far far away in a tropical country… Salud! 

 

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Día de Independencia in Central America

Día de IndependenciaDía de Independencia or independence day is a national holiday that’s celebrated in Central America on the 15th of September to commemorate the beginning of the war of independence. This war started on the 16th of September in 1810 in Guanajuato, Mexico, when the priest Miguel Hidalgo called for the end of the Spanish rule. With the grito de la independencia or the cry of independence, Hidalgo encouraged the people to revolt against the Spanish colonial rule. At that time Mexico and the other countries of Central America (except Panama) formed part of the Viceroyalty of New Spain established following the Spanish conquest in 1521. However, Mexico was the only country that fought for independence. The rebellion started by Hidalgo led to a long and bloody war which took a decade before Spain declared Mexico and the other Central American countries independent in 1821.

Independence and la patria

The start of the war is commemorated yearly in all Central American countries from Mexico until Costa Rica. While in most countries the focus is on parades, student activities, and assemblies, in Mexico día de independencia is a big fiesta with food, music, and fireworks. Because it’s all about the patria or the fatherland, the weeks before half of September national symbols arise everywhere. The public and national buildings are decorated, street vendors are selling national symbols in all kinds, and the public squares are cleaned and prepared for entertainment.

The Mexican fiesta

In Mexico on the evening of the 15th of September which is called el Día del Grito, the celebrations are started. Traditionally around 11 o’clock in the evening the president rings the bell of the national palace at the central square zócalo in Mexico City. After that he will speak the grito de dolores mentioning the names of the important heroes of the Mexican War of Independece, and the speech is ended shouting ¡Viva México! three times. Often the public adds cabrones to it. After this the president waves the Mexican flag followed by the playing and singing of the national anthem. Then it’s fiesta time, and the party continues until dawn. For the people without hangover or cruda, the following morning on the 16th of September which is the Day of Independence the military performs a parade starting from the zócalo and passing by Hidalgo Memorial and other main places in Mexico City.